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Faculty & Staff


CSHL’s research faculty has a rich history of contributing some of the most fundamental discoveries in molecular biology and genetics. This legacy, which includes 8 Nobel Prize winners, continues to be strengthened today by the 51 faculty members who head cutting-edge laboratories in a broad range of fields, some of which are often and increasingly interdisciplinary. Their efforts and output are consistently, internationally recognized. Thomson Reuters’ Essential Science Indicators, a leading index for institutional performance, has ranked CSHL in the top 1% of institutions most cited in published research and its faculty among the top three in terms of its influence in molecular biology and genetics.

CSHL Faculty Guide

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Dinu Florin Albeanu

Dinu Florin Albeanu

Associate Professor

Ph.D., Harvard University, 2008

neuronal circuits, sensory coding and synaptic plasticity, neuronal correlates of behavior, olfactory processing

How does the brain encode stimuli from the outside world to give rise to perceptions? What does a smell look like in the brain? The focus of my group is to understand how neural circuits compute sensory-motor transformations across different contexts, senses, and brain states to generate meaningful behaviors.

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Gurinder Atwal

Gurinder Atwal

Associate Professor

Ph.D., Cornell University, 2002

population genetics, bioinformatics, cancer, stochastic processes, statistical mechanics and information theory

The biological landscape is made up of millions of variables that interact in complex and often seemingly random ways. I am applying principles from physical and computational sciences to the study of biology to find patterns in these interactions, to obtain insight into population genetics, human evolution, and diseases including cancer.

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Anne Churchland

Anne Churchland

Associate Professor

Ph.D., University of California, San Francisco, 2003

decision-making, electrophysiology, sensory processing, vision, audition, neural computation, modeling, behavior

Animals are faced with many decisions. They must integrate information from a variety of sources – sensory inputs like smell and sound as well as memories and innate impulses – to arrive at a single behavioral output. My laboratory investigates the neural circuits that underlie decision-making.

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Alexander Dobin

Alexander Dobin

Assistant Professor

Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 2003

computational genomics, transcriptomics, epigenomics, gene regulation, big data, precision medicine

Next generation sequencing technologies revolutionized many areas of genetics and molecular biology, enabling quantitative analyses of the entire genomes and paving the way for Personalized Medicine. We develop novel statistical methods and computational algorithms for multi-omics processing and integration, and leverage Big Genomic Data to elucidate various problems in precision health, such as genetic and epigenetic mechanisms of cancer development and progression, and clinical impact of functional variants.

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Camila dos Santos

Camila dos Santos

Assistant Professor

Universidade Estadual de Campinas - Brazil, 2007

breast cancer, mammary gland development, stem cells, enhancer biology, gene regulation

Among the changes that occur during pregnancy, those affecting the breasts have been found to subsequently modify breast cancer risk. My laboratory investigates how the signals present during pregnancy permanently alter the way gene expression is controlled and how these changes affect normal and malignant mammary development.

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Mikala Egeblad

Mikala Egeblad

Associate Professor

Ph.D., University of Copenhagen and the Danish Cancer Society, 2000

tumor microenvironment, intravital imaging, tumor-associated myeloid cells, breast cancer

Cancer cells are surrounded by immune cells, blood vessels, chemical signals and a support matrix – collectively, the tumor microenvironment. Most microenvironments help tumors grow and metastasize, but some can restrict tumors. My lab studies how to target the bad microenvironments and support the good ones to combat cancer.

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Tatiana Engel

Tatiana Engel

Assistant Professor

Ph.D., Humboldt University of Berlin, Germany, 2007

neural dynamics and computation, neural circuit models, machine learning, stochastic processes, dynamical systems theory, decision-making, attention

My lab investigates how perception and cognition arise from changes in neural activity. We develop and apply computational methods to discover dynamic patterns in large-scale neural activity recordings. We then create mathematical models to explain how these activity changes emerge from signaling between neurons, ultimately driving behavior.

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Douglas Fearon

Douglas Fearon

Professor

M.D., Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 1968

cancer immunology, pancreatic cancer, mouse models

I’m studying how to harness the power of the immune system to fight cancer. Our underlying premise is that the microenvironment within a tumor suppresses the immune system. We have found a way to eliminate this suppression in the mouse model of pancreatic cancer, which has led to development of a drug for human pancreatic cancer that will enter phase 1 clinical trials in 2015.

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Hiro Furukawa

Hiro Furukawa

Professor

Ph.D., The University of Tokyo, 2001

membrane proteins, x-ray crystallography, electrophysiology, neurodegenerative disease

The nervous system transmits information by passing chemical signals from one nerve cell to the others. This signal transmission relies on a variety of proteins to receive and transmit the chemical signals. My group studies the structure and function of neurotransmitter receptors and ion channels that regulate fundamental neuronal activities.

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Jesse Gillis

Jesse Gillis

Associate Professor

Ph.D., University of Toronto, 2007

co-expression, meta-analysis, single cell expression, gene networks, multifunctionality

Of the tens of thousand of protein-coding genes in the human genome, only a small portion have an experimentally defined function. For the rest, how can we determine what they do? My lab develops computational predictions based on co-expression networks. We are applying our predictions to understand neuropsychiatric disorders.

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Thomas Gingeras

Thomas Gingeras

Professor

Ph.D., New York University, 1976

genome-wide organization of transcription and the functional roles of non-protein coding RNAs

Only a small portion of the RNAs encoded in any genome are used to make proteins. My lab investigates what these noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) do within and outside of cells, where regulators of their expression are located in the genome, and how perturbations of ncRNAs and their regulators contribute to disease.

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Molly Hammell

Molly Hammell

Associate Professor

Ph.D., Dartmouth College, 2003

gene regulatory networks, integrated genomic analysis, bioinformatics, RNA biology, small RNAs

To ensure that cells function normally, tens of thousands of genes must be turned on or off together. To do this, regulatory molecules - transcription factors and non-coding RNAs – simultaneously control hundreds of genes. My group studies how the resulting gene networks function and how they can be compromised in human disease.

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Christopher Hammell

Christopher Hammell

Associate Professor

Ph.D., Dartmouth Medical School, 2002

post-transcriptional gene regulation, control of animal developmental timing, RNA biology

As organisms develop, genes turn on and off with a precise order and timing, much like the order and duration of notes in a song. My group uses model organisms to understand the molecules that control the tempo of development. We also study how changes in the timing of gene expression contribute to diseases like cancer.

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Z. Josh Huang

Z. Josh Huang

Professor
Charles Robertson Professor of Neuroscience

Ph.D., Brandeis University, 1994

development and function of the GABAergic inhibitory circuitry in neocortex, cortical circuits, mouse genetics, developmental plasticity, neurogenomics, autism

Studies the development and organization of neural circuits in the mouse cerebral cortex. His team uses an integrated approach to identify neuronal cell types and discover how they interact to process information and guide behavior, focusing on the motor cortex that controls forelimb movement. His studies of inhibitory interneurons, such as chandelier cells, have implications for understanding schizophrenia and autism.

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Ivan Iossifov

Ivan Iossifov

Associate Professor

Ph.D., Columbia University, 2008

computational biology, molecular networks, human genetics, human disease, applied statistical and machine learning, biomedical text-mining, molecular evolution

Every gene has a job to do, but genes rarely act alone. Biologists have built models of molecular interaction networks that represent the complex relationships between thousands of different genes. I am using computational approaches to help define these relationships, work that is helping us to understand the causes of common diseases including autism, bipolar disorder, and cancer.

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David Jackson

David Jackson

Professor

Ph.D., University of East Anglia, 1991

plant development, stem cell signaling, genomics and imaging

My lab studies genes and signals in cells that regulate the growth and shape of plants. We have discovered several genes that control plant architecture by exerting an influence on stem cells. By identifying the genes that control the number of stem cells in corn plants, for example, we’ve discovered a means of boosting the yield of that vital staple.

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Leemor Joshua-Tor

Leemor Joshua-Tor

Professor & HHMI Investigator
W.M. Keck Professor of Structural Biology

Ph.D., The Weizmann Institute of Science, 1991

structural biology, nucleic acid regulation, RNAi, molecular recognition, X-ray crystallography

Our cells depend on thousands of proteins and nucleic acids that function as tiny machines: molecules that build, fold, cut, destroy, and transport all of the molecules essential for life. My group is discovering how these molecular machines work, looking at interactions between individual atoms to understand how they activate gene expression, DNA replication, and small RNA biology.

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Adam Kepecs

Adam Kepecs

Professor

Ph.D., Brandeis University, 2002

decision-making, neural circuits, behavioral electrophysiology, theoretical neuroscience, neuroeconomics

My lab studies the neurobiological principles underlying cognition and decision-making. Using state-of-the-art technologies, we interrogate neural circuits in rodents as they perform a task. We validate our findings with analogous tasks in humans. We hope to define the neural circuits underlying decisions that will inform the development of new therapies for psychiatric diseases.

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Justin Kinney

Justin Kinney

Assistant Professor

Ph.D., Princeton University, 2008

sequence-function relationships, machine learning, biophysics, transcriptional regulation

From regulating gene expression to fighting off pathogens, biology uses DNA sequence information in many different ways. My research combines theory, computation, and experiment in an effort to better understand the quantitative relationships between DNA sequence and biological function. Much of my work is devoted to developing new methods in statistics and machine learning.

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Alexei Koulakov

Alexei Koulakov

Professor

Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 1998

theoretical neurobiology, quantitative principles of cortical design, computer science, applied mathematics

The complexity of the mammalian brain challenges our ability to explain it. My group applies methods from mathematics and theoretical physics to understand the brain. We are generating novel ideas about neural computation and brain development, including how neurons process information, how brain networks assemble during development, and how brain architecture evolved to facilitate its function.

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Adrian R. Krainer

Adrian R. Krainer

Professor
St. Giles Professorship of Neuroscience

Ph.D., Harvard University, 1986

posttranscriptional control of gene expression, alternative splicing, splicing in genetic diseases and cancer, splicing-targeted antisense therapeutics

Our DNA carries the instructions to manufacture all the molecules needed by a cell. After each gene is copied from DNA into RNA, the RNA message is "spliced" - an editing process involving precise cutting and pasting. I am interested in how splicing normally works, how it is altered in genetic diseases and cancer, and how we can correct these defects for therapy.

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Alexander Krasnitz

Alexander Krasnitz

Associate Professor

Ph.D., Tel Aviv University, 1990

in silico genomics of cancer, single-cell genomics, early detection of cancer, inference from noisy biological data

Many types of cancer display bewildering intra-tumor heterogeneity on a cellular and molecular level, with aggressive malignant cell populations found alongside normal tissue and infiltrating immune cells. I am developing mathematical and statistical tools to disentangle tumor cell population structure, enabling an earlier and more accurate diagnosis of the disease and better-informed clinical decisions.

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Je H. Lee

Je H. Lee

Assistant Professor

M.D., Ph.D., Tufts School of Medicine, 2002

single-cell, in situ RNA-seq, non-coding RNA, spatial genomics, cancer microenvironment, pancreatic cancer

Cells are amazingly complex, with the ability to sense, and remember timing, location and history. I am exploring how cells store this information, and how their surroundings influence their communication with other cells. I am also developing various imaging and molecular sequencing methods for tracking genes, molecules, and cells to understand how cancer cells arise and evolve.

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Dan Levy

Dan Levy

Associate Professor

Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley 2005

computational biology, human genetics, phylogenetics, copy number variation

We have recently come to appreciate that many unrelated diseases, such as autism, congenital heart disease and cancer, are derived from rare and unique mutations, many of which are not inherited but instead occur spontaneously. I am generating algorithms to analyze massive datasets comprising thousands of affected families to identify disease-causing mutations.

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Bo Li

Bo Li

Professor

Ph.D., The University of British Columbia, 2003

synapse, physiology and plasticity, neural circuits, fear processing, reward processing, rodent behaviors related to mental disorders

My group studies the neural circuits underlying cognitive function and dysfunction as they relate to anxiety, depression, schizophrenia and autism. We use sophisticated technologies to manipulate specific neural circuits in the rodent brain to determine their role in behavior. We are interested in changes in synaptic strength that may underlie mental disorders.

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Zachary Lippman

Zachary Lippman

Professor
Jacob Goldfield Professor of Genetics

Ph.D., Watson School of Biological Sciences at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, 2004

plant developmental genetics, mechanisms of phase transitions for flowering time and inflorescence branching, heterosis

My research team studies the genes that determine when and where, and thus how many, flowers are produced on plants. Flowers form on branches called inflorescences, which originate from stem cells. By studying the genes that control how stem cells become inflorescences, we are able to manipulate flower production to improve crop yields.

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Gholson Lyon

Gholson Lyon

Assistant Professor

M.D., Weill Cornell Medical College, 2004
Ph.D., Rockefeller University, 2003

biochemistry, amino-terminal acetylation of proteins, human genetics, neuropsychiatric diseases, whole genome sequencing

My group focuses on human genetics and genomic medicine, with an emphasis on diseases with severe neuropsychiatric manifestations. We collect large family pedigrees and use whole-genome sequencing to define mutations that correlate with the syndromes. We then undertake detailed functional characterization of these mutations.

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Robert Maki

Robert Maki

Professor

Ph.D., Cornell University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 1991
M.D., Cornell University Medical College, 1992

sarcoma, clinical trials, medical oncology, translational research, tumor microenvironment, angiogenesis, epigenetics

With joint appointments at CSHL and Northwell Health, I am working to expand clinical cancer research at our institutions to provide new treatments for patients as well as greater insight into the biology of this complex set of diseases. In my own research, I am collaborating on research in soft-tissue and bone sarcomas to better understand the cancer microenvironment and epigenetics, targeting molecular weaknesses to halt cancer growth.

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Rob Martienssen

Rob Martienssen

Professor & HHMI Investigator

Ph.D., Cambridge University, 1986

plant genetics, transposons, development, gene regulation, DNA methylation

Chromosomes are covered with chemical modifications that help control gene expression. I study this secondary genetic code - the epigenome - and how it is guided by small mobile RNAs in plants and fission yeast. Our discoveries impact plant breeding and human health, and we use this and other genomic information to improve aquatic plants as a source of bioenergy.

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David McCandlish

David McCandlish

Assistant Professor

Ph.D., Duke University, 2012

computational biology, sequence-function relationships, population genetics, protein evolution, machine learning

Some mutations are harmful but others are benign. How can we predict the effects of mutations, both singly and in combination? Using data from experiments that simultaneously measure the effects of thousands of mutations, I develop computational tools to predict the functional impact of mutations in protein coding sequences.

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W. Richard McCombie

W. Richard McCombie

Professor

Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1982

genomics of psychiatric disorders, genomics of cancer, computational genomics, plant genomics

Over the last two decades, revolutionary improvements in DNA sequencing technology have made it faster, more accurate, and much cheaper. We are now able to sequence up to 10 trillion DNA letters in just one month. I harness these technological advancements to assemble genomes for a variety of organisms and probe the genetic basis of neurological disorders, including autism and schizophrenia, better understand cancer progression and understand the complex structures of the genomes of higher plants.

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Alea A. Mills

Alea A. Mills

Professor

Ph.D., University of California, Irvine, 1997

cancer, development, aging, senescence, epigenetics

Cells employ stringent controls to ensure that genes are turned on and off at the correct time and place. Accurate gene expression relies on several levels of regulation, including how DNA and its associated molecules are packed together. I study the diseases arising from defects in these control systems, such as aging and cancer.

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Partha Mitra

Partha Mitra

Professor

Ph.D., Harvard University, 1993

neuroscience, theoretical biology

A theoretical physicist by training, my research is centered around intelligent machines. I do both theoretical and experimental work. The theoretical work is focussed on analyzing distributed/networked algorithms in the context of control theory and machine learning, using tools from statistical physics. My lab is involved in brain-wide mesoscale circuit mapping in the Mouse as well as in the Marmoset. An organizing idea behind my research is that there may be common underlying mathematical principles that constrain evolved biological systems and human-engineered systems.

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Pavel Osten

Pavel Osten

Associate Professor

M.D., Medical School of Charles University, Prague, 1991
Ph.D., SUNY Downstate Brooklyn, 1995

neurobiology of autism and schizophrenia, gene expression-based mapping of brain activity, anatomical mapping of brain connectivity, high throughput microscopy

To understand what’s going wrong in illnesses like autism and schizophrenia, we need to know more about how neural circuits are connected in the healthy brain. We’ve developed advanced imaging methods to draw the first whole-brain activation map in the mouse. Now we’re applying that technology to study changes in brain activity in mice whose behavior models human autism and schizophrenia.

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Ullas Pedmale

Ullas Pedmale

Assistant Professor

Ph.D., University of Missouri, Columbia, 2008

plant growth, signaling, genomics, development, plant-environment interactions

Unlike animals, plants neither have specific organs that see or hear various stimuli, yet, plants are sensitive to their surrounding environment and modify their development according to various external signals. My lab studies how the environment of a plant modulates its growth and development. Understanding environmental control of growth will have far-reaching implications for agriculture, energy production, and many other human activities.

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Stephen Shea

Stephen Shea

Associate Professor

Ph.D., University of Chicago, 2004

olfaction, audition, communication behaviors, in vivo electrophysiology, individual recognition

When confronted with another individual, social animals use multiple sensory inputs ­ smells, sounds, sights, tastes, touches ­ to choose an appropriate behavioral response. My group studies how specific brain circuits support these natural communication behaviors and how disruptions in these circuits can lead to inappropriate use of social information, as in Autism Spectrum Disorders.

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Adam Siepel

Adam Siepel

Professor

Ph.D., University of California, Santa Cruz, 2005

computational biology, population genetics, computational genomics, molecular evolution, gene regulation

I am a computer scientist who is fascinated by the challenge of making sense of vast quantities of genetic data. My research group focuses in particular on questions involving human evolution and transcriptional regulation.

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Raffaella Sordella

Raffaella Sordella

Associate Professor

Ph.D., University of Turin, 1998

molecular therapeutics, signal transduction

Two challenges in cancer biology guide my work: first, how do tumors become addicted to certain gene products, and second, how do tumors develop resistance to anti-cancer drugs. I focus on the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is both addictive when mutated and a common source of drug resistance. We are also identifying new targets for the treatment of lung cancer.

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David L. Spector

David L. Spector

Professor & Director of Research
Robert B. Gardner, Jr. Professor

Ph.D., Rutgers University, 1980

cell biology, gene expression, nuclear structure, nuclear structure, non-coding RNAs

The immense amount of DNA, RNA and proteins that contribute to our genetic programs are precisely organized inside the cell¹s nucleus. My group studies how nuclear organization impacts gene regulation, and how misregulation of non-coding RNAs contributes to human diseases such as cancer.

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Arne Stenlund

Arne Stenlund

Associate Professor

Ph.D., Uppsala University, 1984

papillomavirus, cancer, DNA replication

Despite the development of preventive vaccines, human papillomaviruses (HPVs) still infect more than five million women each year, significantly increasing their risk of cervical cancer. I am working to identify how HPV multiplies so that we may develop drugs that can defeat the virus once it has infected an individual.

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Bruce Stillman

Bruce Stillman

President and Chief Executive Officer
William J. Matheson Professor of Cancer Biology

Ph.D., Australian National University, 1979

cancer, cell cycle, DNA replication, chromatin assembly, biochemistry, yeast genetics

Every time a cell divides, it must accurately copy its DNA. With 3 billion “letters” in the human genome, this is no small task. My studies reveal the many steps and molecular actors involved, as well as how errors in DNA replication are involved in diseases that range from cancer to rare genetic disorders.

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Jessica Tollkuhn

Jessica Tollkuhn

Assistant Professor

Ph.D., University of California, San Diego, 2006

transcriptional regulation, chromatin, critical periods in neurodevelopment, steroid hormones and behavior

I am interested in how transient events during development program neurons to take on a specific identity and function. More specifically, I am studying how estrogen and testosterone generate sex differences in the brain and behavior.

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Nicholas Tonks

Nicholas Tonks

Professor
Caryl Boies Professor of Cancer Research

Ph.D., University of Dundee, 1985

posttranslational modification, phosphorylation, phosphatases, signal transduction, protein structure and function

Cells must constantly react to what is happening around them, adapting to changes in neighboring cells or the environment. I study the signals that cells use to exchange information with their surroundings. Our group is finding drugs that target these signals and thus can treat diabetes, obesity, cancer, and autism spectrum disorders.

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Lloyd Trotman

Lloyd Trotman

Professor

Ph.D., University of Zurich, 2001

cancer modeling and treatment, senescence and tumor progression, cancer visualization, PTEN regulation

We have recently developed the first genetic mouse model for therapy and analysis of metastatic prostate cancer. Now we can test if and how modern concepts of cancer evolution can outperform the 80-year-old standard of care - hormone deprivation therapy - and turn lethal prostate cancer into a curable disease.

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David Tuveson

David Tuveson

Professor
Roy J. Zuckerberg Professor of Cancer Research

M.D., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1994

pancreatic cancer, experimental therapeutics, diagnostics, mouse models, cancer genetics

Pancreatic cancer is an extremely lethal malignancy. On average, patients who are diagnosed with pancreatic cancer succumb to the disease within 6 months. Research is the only way to defeat pancreatic cancer. My lab is making progress toward finding a cure by detecting the disease earlier and designing novel therapeutic approaches.

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Chris Vakoc

Chris Vakoc

Associate Professor

M.D., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 2007

chromatin, transcriptional regulation, acute myeloid leukemia, BET bromodomains, lysine methyltransferases

Cancer cells achieve their pathogenicity by changing which genes are on and off. To maintain these changes in gene expression, cancer cells rely on proteins that interact with DNA or modify chromatin. My group investigates how such factors sustain the aberrant capabilities of cancer cells, thereby identifying new therapeutic targets.

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Linda Van Aelst

Linda Van Aelst

Professor
Harold and Florence & Ethel McNeill Professor of Cancer Research

Ph.D., Catholic University of Leuven, 1991

signal transduction, Ras and Rho proteins, tumorigenesis, neuronal development and disorders

Normal cell function relies on coordinated communication between all the different parts of the cell. These communication signals control what a cell does, what shape it takes, and how it interacts with other cells. I study these signaling networks to understand how they guard against cancer and neurological disorders.

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Doreen Ware

Doreen Ware

Adjunct Associate Professor

Ph.D., Ohio State University, 2000

genomics, genome evolution, genetic diversity, gene regulation, plant biology, computational biology

When we think of evolution, we often think about physical changes, like a plant developing broader leaves to collect more solar energy. Such evolution actually occurs within the plant’s DNA. I am using computational analysis and modeling to visualize how plant genomes have evolved over time, particularly those of staple crops. We are learning from this work to improve the range and yield of modern plants.

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Michael Wigler

Michael Wigler

Professor
Russell and Janet Doubleday Professor of Cancer Research

Ph.D., Columbia University, 1978

human genetic disorders, population genetics, cancer genomics

Devastating diseases like cancer and autism can be caused by spontaneous changes to our DNA—mutations first appearing in the child, or in our tissues as we age. We are developing methods to discover these changes in individuals, tumors, and even single cells, to promote early detection and treatments

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Anthony Zador

Anthony Zador

Professor
The Alle Davis and Maxine Harrison Professor of Neurosciences

M.D., Ph.D., Yale University, 1994

neural circuits, sensory processing, attention and decision making, attention, molecular tool development, connectomics

My lab studies how circuitry in the brain gives rise to complex behaviors, one of nature’s great mysteries. We study how the auditory cortex processes sound, and how this is interrupted in autism. We also seek to obtain a wiring diagram of the mouse brain at the resolution of individual neurons. Our unusual approach exploits cheap and rapid “next-gen” gene sequencing technology.

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Hongwu Zheng

Hongwu Zheng

Assistant Professor

Ph.D., Boston University School of Medicine, 2003

malignant gliomagenesis, animal modeling, stem cell renewaldifferentiation, genetic and epigenetic regulation

I study a type of brain cancer known as malignant glioma, which differs from healthy tissue by a small number of defining characteristics. By forcing glioma cells to adopt these healthy traits, we can stop tumor growth. My group searches for therapeutic ways to force this transition.

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Semir Beyaz

Semir Beyaz

CSHL Fellow
Donaldson Translational Fellow

Harvard University, 2017

Immunology, Cancer, Nutrition, Metabolism, Eigenetics

Are you really what you eat? Our goal is to uncover the precise mechanisms that link nutrition to organismal health and disease states at the cellular and molecular level. A particular focus in our lab is to understand how dietary perturbations affect the immune system and contribute to the risk of diseases that are associated with immune dysfunction such as cancer.

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Jason Sheltzer

Jason Sheltzer

CSHL Fellow

Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2015

cancer genetics, aneuploidy, genome dosage imbalances, systems biology

Nearly all tumors exhibit a condition known as aneuploidy – their cells contain the wrong number of chromosomes. We’re working to understand how aneuploidy impacts cancer progression, in hopes of developing therapies that can specifically eliminate aneuploid cancers while leaving normal cells unharmed.

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Lingbo Zhang

Lingbo Zhang

CSHL Fellow

Ph.D., Joint program of Massachusetts Institute of Technology and National University of Singapore, 2013

hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, self-renewal, metabolism, myelodysplastic syndrome, leukemia

The research of my lab focuses on normal and malignant hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, specifically early erythroid progenitors and leukemic cells. We utilize both CRISPR/Cas functional genomic and forward chemical genomic approaches to uncover critical genes and small chemical compounds regulating the self-renewal of normal and malignant hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. The ultimate goal of our research is to identify novel therapeutics for treatment-resistant hematopoietic malignancies including myelodysplastic syndrome and acute leukemia through targeting of novel self-renewal pathways and metabolic vulnerabilities.

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Kenneth Chang

Kenneth Chang

Research Assistant Professor/Manager, Functional Genomics

Currently the Director of the Functional Genomics Shared Resource at CSHL. His studies focus on shRNA, microRNA, RNA interference, and siRNA. The lab has studied cancer proliferation gene discovery through functional genomics.

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Scott Lyons

Scott Lyons

Research Assistant Professor/Manager, Animal Imaging

Applies non-invasive imaging methods and develops new imaging reagents to facilitate the use of genetically engineered mouse models of cancer in pre-clinical and basic cancer research. As Director of Animal Imaging, he provides collaborative research support to investigators at both CSHL and neighboring institutions and will an important role in the pre-clinical research facility at CSHL.

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Darryl Pappin

Darryl Pappin

Research Professor

Ph.D., University of Leeds,1984

proteomics, mass spectrometry, protein chemistry

Our genome can encode hundreds of thousands of different proteins, the molecular machines that do the work that is the basis of life. I use proteomics, a combination of protein chemistry, mass spectrometry and informatics, to identify precisely which proteins are present in cells - cells from different tissues, developmental stages, and disease states.

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Jon Preall

Jon Preall

Research Assistant Professor/Head of Genomics Technology Development

Developing single-cell genomics technologies for applications related to cancer progression, immune surveillance, and discovery of rare novel cell types and transcriptional programs.

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Michael Ronemus

Michael Ronemus

Research Assistant Professor

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Johannes Yeh

Johannes Yeh

Research Assistant Professor/Mgr, Antibody & Phage Display

Studies the creation of engineered biologics such as antibodies, proteins and peptides, for therapeutics and translational medicine. The lab employs protein engineering and chemical biology approaches to develop therapeutic biologics acting on cell signaling machineries in order to abrogate pathological cellular behavior. He is currently the Director of CSHL Cancer Center Antibody Shared Resource- a collaborative resource for high quality antibody development.

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Seungtai Yoon

Seungtai Yoon

Research Assistant Professor

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Alexander Gann

Alexander Gann

WSBS Professor & Dean
Lita Annenberg Hazen Dean

Ph.D., University of Edinburgh, 1989

My major areas of interest are gene regulation and the history of molecular biology.

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Terri Grodzicker

Terri Grodzicker

Dean of Academic Affairs

Ph.D., Columbia University, 1969

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John R. Inglis

John R. Inglis

Executive Director of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press

Ph.D., University of Edinburgh Medical School, 1976

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David A. Micklos

David A. Micklos

Executive Director of the Dolan DNA Learning Center

M.S., University of Maryland, 1982

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David J. Stewart

David J. Stewart

Executive Director of Meetings & Courses, WSBS Professor

Ph.D., University of Cambridge, 1988

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James D. Watson

James D. Watson

Oliver R. Grace Professor Emeritus/Chancellor Emeritus

Ph.D., Indiana University, 1950

Dr. James D. Watson, co-discoverer of DNA’s double helix, is a Nobel laureate, past president of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, and generous philanthropist.

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Jan A. Witkowski

Jan A. Witkowski

WSBS Professor

Ph.D., University of London, 1972

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Grigori Enikolopov

Grigori Enikolopov

Adjunct Professor

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Gregory Hannon

Gregory Hannon

Adjunct Professor

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Jim Hicks

Jim Hicks

Adjunct Research Professor

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Scott Lowe

Scott Lowe

Adjunct Professor

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Larry Norton

Larry Norton

Adjunct Professor

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Michael Schatz

Michael Schatz

Adjunct Associate Professor

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Bhubaneswar Mishra

Bhubaneswar Mishra

QB Visiting Scholar

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Mathew Ridley

Mathew Ridley

Visiting Professor

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Stuart Weisbrod

Stuart Weisbrod

Visiting Professor

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Joan Alexander

Research Investigator

Wigler laboratory


Peter Andrews

Senior Computer Scientist

Wigler laboratory


Gayatri Arun

Research Investigator

Spector laboratory


Lindsey Baker

Research Investigator

Tuveson laboratory


Osama El Demerdash

Computer Scientist

Vakoc laboratory


Diane Esposito

Director of Research Compliance/Research Investigator


Christopher Faehnle

Research Investigator

Joshua-Tor laboratory


Qing Gao

Research Investigator

Trotman laboratory


Carla Gauss

Research Investigator

Tonks & Pappin laboratories


Sara Goodwin

Research Investigator/Project Manager

CCG Shared Resources


Gilbert Henry

Research Investigator

Zador laboratory


Manzar Hossain

Research Investigator

Stillman laboratory


Vivek Kumar

Computer Scientist

Ware laboratory


Yoon-Ha Lee

Research Investigator

Wigler laboratory


Leyi Li

Director

Gene Targeting Shared Resource, Mills laboratory


Youngkyu Park

Research Investigator

Tuveson laboratory


Michael Regulski

Research Investigator

Martienssen laboratory


Yi-Jun Sheu

Research Investigator

Stillman laboratory


Damianos Skopelitis

Research Investigator

Vakoc Laboratory


Mona Spector

Research Investigator

Wigler laboratory


Asya Stepansky

Research Investigator

Wigler laboratory


Herve Tiriac

Research Investigator

Tuveson laboratory


Zihua Wang

Senior Research Investigator

Wigler laboratory


Boris Yamrom

Senior Computer Scientist

Wigler laboratory


Kai Yu

Research Investigator

Li Laboratory