Newsstand Menu

LabDish is published and managed by the Public Affairs Department at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. The blog highlights the people who make possible the Laboratory’s world-class scientific research and educational activities. The blog’s writers also take their readers “backstage” from time to time for a behind-the-scenes look at the scientific process itself.

Search Stories


Welcome to the real world of science, I’ll be your guide

February 5th, 2018

Blog
Institutional

Jackie Novatt was determined to show the people on her campus tours how science really works—and landed her dream job in the process....

Welcome to the real world of science, I’ll be your guide

45 years later, a scientist realizes he’s a star

January 24th, 2018

Blog
Education

David Haas was stunned to learn the impact of work he abandoned decades ago. He took a CSHL course to see it for himself....

45 years later, a scientist realizes he’s a star

Turning off the immune system is hard. Turning it on against cancer is easier.

January 10th, 2018

Blog
Research

How Professor Doug Fearon’s experiences with autoimmune disease patients contributed to the discovery of a new potential immunotherapy for cancer...

Turning off the immune system is hard. Turning it on against cancer is easier.

A spot at the podium: The Women in Biology Speakers List

December 5th, 2017

Blog
Education

The gender imbalance in slates of invited speakers for scientific conferences is an issue that CSHL's Women in Science and Engineering (WiSE) group...

A spot at the podium: The Women in Biology Speakers List

For brain cells, you are who you speak to

October 31st, 2017

Blog
Research

Tracking a person entails searching through their email, phone, and other means of communication to map out their network. To do this for a brain cell...

For brain cells, you are who you speak to

Halfway around the world, a reunion of friends opens door to a cancer discovery

August 31st, 2017

Blog
Research

After interviewing for a position in a pancreatic cancer lab at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, 7,000 miles from his hometown in South Korea, Chang-il...

Halfway around the world, a reunion of friends opens door to a cancer discovery

Realizing a dream: How a program for undergraduates placed me at the center of CRISPR research

August 16th, 2017

Blog
Education

Hands-on experience using CRISPR and access to top scientists from around the world who are pioneering its use made this a memorable summer for...

Realizing a dream: How a program for undergraduates placed me at the center of CRISPR research

Science and architecture: Back to the future!

July 20th, 2017

Blog
History Institutional

3D images are a throwback to the past as CSHL and Centerbrook Architects rediscover a 1950s building that has been occupied by some of the Laboratory...

Science and architecture: Back to the future!

Eugenics used to be incredibly popular. We can’t let that happen again.

July 5th, 2017

Blog
History Institutional

Miriam Rich, the recipient of CSHL’s 2017-18 Sydney Brenner Research Scholarship, is determined to show how the concept of “good genes” became...

Eugenics used to be incredibly popular. We can’t let that happen again.

How cool is science? Students use barcoded DNA to identify a weapon against antibiotic resistance

June 14th, 2017

Blog
Education

Sometimes viruses cause harmful infections, but students in the DNA Learning Center’s Urban Barcode Research Program identified a new virus that could...

How cool is science? Students use barcoded DNA to identify a weapon against antibiotic resistance

Math teacher wins school popularity contest (again)

June 7th, 2017

Blog
Education

Math isn’t exactly known as “everyone’s favorite subject,” yet Associate Professor Mickey Atwal has won the Watson School of Biological Science’s...

Math teacher wins school popularity contest (again)

Expert Explains: Is confidence measurable?

May 16th, 2017

Blog
Research

Confidence is “not just a feeling,” according to neuroscientist Adam Kepecs. Finding the confidence-calculating circuitry in our brains has huge...

Expert Explains: Is confidence measurable?

Alexa DeAngelis didn’t see a place for herself in science, so she’s making one

April 28th, 2017

Blog
Education

For Alexa DeAngelis, who was recently awarded a Fulbright scholarship, combining a desire to help people with a passion for biochemistry means design...

Alexa DeAngelis didn’t see a place for herself in science, so she’s making one

Everyday steps you can take for science

April 21st, 2017

Blog
Education

Effective advocacy for science is the culmination of many small steps...

Everyday steps you can take for science

What a real-life science test looks like

March 24th, 2017

Blog
Research

By revealing evidence that contradicts the rationale for a new cancer drug, a pair of student scientists learns firsthand that when you do science...

What a real-life science test looks like

Expert explains: Can we understand memories at the molecular level?

March 13th, 2017

Blog
Research

Memories may seem intangible, but many scientists are working to figure out how they are physically stored in the brain. To achieve this, we’ll need ...

Expert explains: Can we understand memories at the molecular level?

New art supplies for visualizing tiny machines in the brain

March 1st, 2017

Blog
Research

An unusual, but beautiful sight can be found among the figures of a recent scientific paper about some of the tiny machines in our brain: watercolor...

New art supplies for visualizing tiny machines in the brain

For Alan Alda, science communication is a state of mind

December 9th, 2016

Blog
Institutional

An interview with actor and science communication advocate Alan Alda about his work at the Alda Center for Communicating Science....

For Alan Alda, science communication is a state of mind

No (real) moustache required to join the “Movember” party

November 15th, 2016

Blog
Research

Members of Trotman don fake moustaches in order to raise money for prostate cancer research during Movember. ...

No (real) moustache required to join the “Movember” party

The “secret” science center where openness is everything

October 27th, 2016

Blog
Banbury Research

Lyme disease researcher Steven Schutzer talks about the important meetings held in the Banbury Center....

The “secret” science center where openness is everything

A theoretical physicist’s approach to breast cancer

October 21st, 2016

Blog
Research

Associate Professor Mickey Atwal explains how exploring numbers and patterns could lead to a new cancer treatment strategy....

A theoretical physicist’s approach to breast cancer

Expert explains: What’s the connection between antioxidants and cancer?

October 14th, 2016

Blog
Research

David Tuveson discusses the relationship between antioxidants and cancer, and how the former doesn't necessarily prevent the latter....

Expert explains: What’s the connection between antioxidants and cancer?

Three words I heard from my pediatric oncologist that still haunt me

September 26th, 2016

Blog
Research

Kayla Funk, a childhood cancer survivor, on her experiences with pediatric cancer and the push for more funding for research....

Three words I heard from my pediatric oncologist that still haunt me

Why calling childhood cancers “rare” is missing the point

September 19th, 2016

Blog
Research

Associate Professor Christopher Vakoc on why calling pediatric cancers "rare" actually hurts their chances of being studied....

Why calling childhood cancers “rare” is missing the point

How a cold-causing virus and inexplicable experiments helped revolutionize thinking about the genome

September 6th, 2016

Blog
Research

Nobel laureate Richard Roberts discusses the importance of RNA splicing and how scientists can learn from "failed" experiments....

How a cold-causing virus and inexplicable experiments helped revolutionize thinking about the genome

Painting with microbes brings an unseen world into public view

August 24th, 2016

Blog
Education

We live in exciting times. Until recently, the microscope was the only way for scientists to take a closer look at microorganisms. ...

Painting with microbes brings an unseen world into public view

Riding out of the shadows of ALS, toward better treatments

August 1st, 2016

Blog
Research

Graduate student Lisa Krug discusses her research and personal connection to ALS, and Ride for Life, a not-for-profit organization for ALS research....

Riding out of the shadows of ALS, toward better treatments

Science is hard, and these high schoolers are fine with that

July 20th, 2016

Blog
Education

With DNA barcoding, high school seniors Sydney Lyncook and Tanjil Uddin realized that they had the power to show whether the manufacturers of ...

Science is hard, and these high schoolers are fine with that

Don’t fall into the culture gap between science and business

June 8th, 2016

Blog
Education

Key takeaways from the lecture “Bench to Bioscience Enterprise” which talks about the connections between business and science....

Don’t fall into the culture gap between science and business

DIY neuroscience opens up a universe of possibilities in Transylvania

June 1st, 2016

Blog
Education

Do-it-yourself (“DIY”) science evokes images of amateur scientists tinkering with test tubes in garages on the weekends. So, at first, the picture of ...

DIY neuroscience opens up a universe of possibilities in Transylvania

Expert explains: Why is autism more common in boys?

April 29th, 2016

Blog
Research

Ivan Iossifov talks about some of the reasons why autism disproportionately effects boys on a genetic level....

Expert explains: Why is autism more common in boys?

Expert explains: What do autism “risk genes” do?

April 21st, 2016

Blog
Research

A discussion with Ivan Iossifov with what exactly the term "risk genes" means and what they do....

Expert explains: What do autism “risk genes” do?

Expert explains: How many autism “risk genes” have scientists found?

April 14th, 2016

Blog
Research

A look at the research which points to the different genes potentially at the root of autism....

Expert explains: How many autism “risk genes” have scientists found?

Expert explains: Where does autism come from when it doesn’t run in the family?

April 7th, 2016

Blog
Research

Associate Professor Ivan Iossifov discusses how parents who are not autistic can pass autism onto their children through their genes....

Expert explains: Where does autism come from when it doesn’t run in the family?

Imaging hundreds of neurons using ultrafast lasers hints at how brains make decisions

March 15th, 2016

Blog
Research

Neuroscientist Matt Kaufman uses brief, ultrafast laser pulses to understand how the brain makes sensory-guided decisions....

Imaging hundreds of neurons using ultrafast lasers hints at how brains make decisions

If you thought all neuroscientists work with neurons, you’re wrong

February 25th, 2016

Blog
Research

Neuroscientists talk about the importance of the intersections between theory and experiment, and how it has shaped their work....

If you thought all neuroscientists work with neurons, you’re wrong

How healthy cells might help cancer survive

February 4th, 2016

Blog
Research

A story on Mikala Egeblad's breast cancer research and the importance of the tumor microenvironment....

How healthy cells might help cancer survive

Partners Profile: High School Senior Tamanna Bhatia on becoming a scientist

January 26th, 2016

Blog
Education

An interview with Partners for the Future participant Tamanna Bhatia and her work in Alea Mill's lab studying cancer cells....

Partners Profile: High School Senior Tamanna Bhatia on becoming a scientist

A new way to fear: Lady lab rats raise important questions for behavioral research

January 12th, 2016

Blog
Research

A discussion of female rats as research subjects and how their hormonal cycle comes into play....

A new way to fear: Lady lab rats raise important questions for behavioral research

Solving the problem with penicillin

January 11th, 2016

Blog
History Institutional

In celebration of scientist Milislav Demerec, a look at how he discovered a strain of Penicillium that more effectively produced pencillin....

Solving the problem with penicillin

5th Graders spend a day as young scientists

December 16th, 2015

Blog
Education

Students from the West Side Elementary School learn about the history and workings of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory....

5th Graders spend a day as young scientists

DNA Justice—How the courtroom can learn from science

December 7th, 2015

Blog
History

The case of Marvin Lamont Anderson, who was exonerated through the use of DNA evidence....

DNA Justice—How the courtroom can learn from science

High School students support pancreatic cancer research in a big way

November 25th, 2015

Blog
Research

Local high school students raise over $3,500 for pancreatic cancer research during the Long Island Pancreatic Cancer Research Walk....

High School students support pancreatic cancer research in a big way

Movember: Fighting for health in the Lab and the gym

November 20th, 2015

Blog
Research

Dawid Nowak discusses the difficulties and challenges involved in understanding pancreatic cancer....

Movember: Fighting for health in the Lab and the gym

Breast cancer survivors show Camila dos Santos what’s important about her research

November 17th, 2015

Blog
Research

Camila dos Santos talks about what she has learned by talking with breast cancer survivors....

Breast cancer survivors show Camila dos Santos what’s important about her research

Breaking down breast cancer at CSHL

October 30th, 2015

Blog
Research

A look at how several researchers at CSHL contribute to the field of breast cancer research....

Breaking down breast cancer at CSHL

Who (else) was at Banbury in 1989 setting the stage for the Human Genome Project?

October 27th, 2015

Blog
Education History

A historical look back at the 1989 meeting at the Banbury Center which sparked the idea of the Human Genome Project....

Who (else) was at Banbury in 1989 setting the stage for the Human Genome Project?

Breast Cancer Awareness Month: Mary-Claire King’s trailblazing research

October 8th, 2015

Blog
Research

A look at the career of Mary-Claire King a geneticist who worked on the causes of breast cancer....

Breast Cancer Awareness Month: Mary-Claire King’s trailblazing research

The Human Genome Project opened a new era of science

October 2nd, 2015

Blog
Education History

A look back at the start of the Human Genome Project and CSHL's James Watson's role in it....

The Human Genome Project opened a new era of science

Painting a colorful path of support for autism research

July 22nd, 2015

Blog
Education Giving

Stephanie de Lesseps organizes a color run that earned $10,000 for autism research at CSHL....

Painting a colorful path of support for autism research

Lending a shore to fellow LI researchers

June 23rd, 2015

Blog
Research

Long Island University - Post and Adelphi University researchers team up with CSHL to study the Asian shorecrab....

Lending a shore to fellow LI researchers

From the Laboratory of Barbara McClintock–Nobel tools inspire award-winning art

June 16th, 2015

Blog
History Institutional

Celebrating Barbara McClintock's birthday with a painting by Elizabeth Turnbull inspired by the Nobel laureate....

<em>From the Laboratory of Barbara McClintock</em>–Nobel tools inspire award-winning art

“Science is our candle in the dark”

May 29th, 2015

Blog
Education WSBS

The remarks of Jack Walleshauser at the 2015 Watson School of Biological Sciences graduation....

“Science is our candle in the dark”

A unique partnership

March 24th, 2015

Blog
Education Research

The story of a high school student working with Michael Schatz to create an app that analyzes DNA....

A unique partnership

Girls who code (at Cold Spring Harbor)

February 3rd, 2015

Blog
Education WSBS

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory joins with Girls Who Code to empower girls into a future in STEM and technology....

Girls who code (at Cold Spring Harbor)

Fighting pediatric cancer

January 20th, 2015

Blog
Research

A discussion on the mission of Christina Renna Foundation and its fight against pediatric cancers....

Fighting pediatric cancer

New investigators join CSHL

November 14th, 2014

Blog
Research

An interview with newly hired investigators Scott Lyons and Lingbo Zhang....

New investigators join CSHL

New junior faculty join CSHL

November 12th, 2014

Blog
Research

Interviews with new junior faculty members Jessica Tollkuhn and Je Lee...

New junior faculty join CSHL

New senior faculty join CSHL

November 10th, 2014

Blog
Research

Interviews with new faculty Adam Siepel and Douglas Fearon....

New senior faculty join CSHL

Election Day: making medical research a priority

October 30th, 2014

Blog
Institutional

CSHL partnered Research!America in a bipartisan effort to find out where political candidates stand on research funding....

Election Day: making medical research a priority

Rally for medical research Capitol Hill Day

September 30th, 2014

Blog
Research

Cristina Aguirre-Chen, Ph.D., a postdoc in Assistant Professor Chris Hammell’s lab discusses her experience at the Rally for Medical Research....

Rally for medical research Capitol Hill Day

Welcome to the Watson School

September 2nd, 2014

Blog
Education WSBS

A graduate student from the Watson School of Biological Sciences talks about the school's history and programs....

Welcome to the Watson School

“When I grow up…”

July 24th, 2014

Blog
Education

Today, scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory are working with the community to make sure that kids are exposed to research at a young age...

“When I grow up…”

Big Data meets DNA

June 17th, 2014

Blog
Research

Postdoctoral researcher Michael Hübner discusses how big data is being used in genomics and disease research....

Big Data meets DNA

High school students learn the fascinating story of Henrietta Lacks

June 5th, 2014

Blog
Education

CSHL Director of Research Professor David Spector discusses his visit to the Horace Mann School....

High school students learn the fascinating story of Henrietta Lacks

A bad neighborhood for cancer

May 14th, 2014

Blog
Research

Miriam Fein, a graduate student working in Egeblad lab, ...

A bad neighborhood for cancer

Finding the genes that underlie autism

April 30th, 2014

Blog
Research

Research Assistant Professor Mike Ronemus talks about the importance of understanding the genetics of autism....

Finding the genes that underlie autism

An interview with cancer’s ‘biographer’

April 14th, 2014

Blog
Research

An interview with The Emperor of Maladies author Siddartha Mukherjee...

An interview with cancer’s ‘biographer’

Celebrating Brain Awareness Week with DNALC’s 3D Brain–revolutionizing education in the classroom and the doctor’s office

March 14th, 2014

Blog
Education Research

The 3D Brain app is an interactive, three-dimensional model of the human brain...

Celebrating Brain Awareness Week with DNALC’s <em>3D Brain</em>–revolutionizing education in the classroom and the doctor’s office

What makes a great scientist tick?

March 4th, 2014

Blog
Education Research

Cold Spring Harbor High School student Skyler Palatnick interviews David L. Spector on his career as a cancer researcher....

What makes a great scientist tick?