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Michael Schatz

Associate Professor
Ph.D., University of Maryland, 2010


Contact
mschatz@cshl.edu
(516) 367-5218 (p)
  Schatz Lab Website
DNA sequencing efforts produce trillions and trillions of As, Cs, Gs, and Ts each minute - but what do the letters mean?  My group develops novel computational methods to extract the information contained in biological sequences.  We are applying these tools to discover mutations associated with cancer and autism and to reconstruct the genomes of important plants, animals, and microbes.

Michael Schatz is a computational biologist and an expert at large-scale computational examination of DNA sequencing data, including the alignment, assembly, and analysis of next-generation sequencing reads. These methods have been used to reconstruct the genomes of previously unsequenced organisms, probe sequence variations, and explore a host of biological features across the tree of life. Recent improvements in sequencing technologies are challenging our capacity to store and analyze the huge volume of DNA sequence data being generated. Consequently, Schatz is particularly interested in capitalizing on the latest advances in distributed and parallel computing, especially cloud computing technologies, to advance the state of the art in bioinformatics and genomics. In a recent breakthrough, Schatz was able to create a hybrid software-based solution to eliminate errors in so-called third-generation sequencing. This makes it remarkably easier to compile, align, and analyze full-genome sequences.

Schatz, M.C., Delcher, A.L., Salzberg, S.L. 2010. Assembly of large genomes using second-generation sequencing. Genome Res. 20: 1165-1173.

Langmead, B., Schatz, M.C., Lin, J., Pop, M., and Salzberg, S.L. 2009. Searching for SNPs with cloud computing. Genome Biol. 10: R134.

Schatz, M.C. 2009. CloudBurst: Highly Sensitive Read Mapping with MapReduce. Bioinformatics. 25:1363-1369.

Phillippy, A.M., Schatz, M.C., Pop, M. 2008. Genome Assembly forensics: finding the elusive mis-assembly. Genome Biol. 9: R55.

Carlton, J.M., Hirt, R.P., Silva, J.C., Delcher, A.L., Schatz, M., et al. 2007. Draft Genome Sequence of the Sexually Transmitted Pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis. Science. 315: 207-212.

Archived Publications
CSHL quantitative biologist Michael Schatz wins prestigious NSF Early CAREER Award
July 29, 2014
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