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Anne Churchland
Assistant Professor

Ph.D., University of California, San Francisco, 2003

Areas of Research:

Decision-making; electrophysiology; sensory processing; vision; audition; neural computation; modeling; behavior

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Study shows rats match humans in decision-making that involves combining different sensory cues

Findings establish a model to study how the brain processes multisensory information, a process that goes awry in autism spectrum disorders

Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y -- The next time you set a trap for that rat running around in your basement, here’s something to consider: you are going up against an opponent whose ability to assess the situation and make decisions is statistically just as good as yours.

A Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) study that compared the ability of humans and rodents to make perceptual decisions based on combining different modes of sensory stimuli—visual and auditory cues, for instance—has found that just like humans, rodents also combine multisensory information and exploit it in a “statistically optimal” way -- or the most efficient and unbiased way possible.

ChurchlandratDecision time: A rat’s decision-making ability was tested via an apparatus that provided visual cues through an LED screen (white rectangle) and audio cues through a speaker. The circles are ports through which the rat poked its nose to receive the cues and liquid rewards.“Statistically optimal combination of multiple sensory stimuli has been well documented in humans, but many have been skeptical about this behavior occurring in other species,” explains Assistant Professor Anne Churchland, Ph.D., a neuroscientist who led the new study. “Our work is the first demonstration of its occurrence in rodents.” The study appears in the March 14 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience.

This discovery is exciting, according to Churchland, because it suggests that the same evolutionarily conserved neural circuits underlie this behavior in both humans and rodents. “By observing this behavior in rodents, we have a chance to explore its neural basis – something that is not feasible to do in people,” Churchland says.

Such investigations, she hopes, will explain why patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) integrate sensory information in an atypical and less-than-optimal way, relative to healthy people. “We can use our rat model to ‘look under the hood’ to understand how the brain is combining multisensory information and be in a better position to develop treatments for these disorders in people.”

Churchland and her team tested multisensory integration in humans and rats by designing a task that gauged how the subjects made decisions when presented with visual and auditory stimuli, separately and in tandem. “We threw in a couple of additional features that made the task challenging enough to simulate a real-life situation,” Churchland adds.

Her team also designed the task keeping in mind the caveat that our brains process visual information much slower than auditory information. “Our task included stimuli that were much more dynamic and temporal (time-varying) compared to other studies that have tested multisensory integration, which we regard an important advance in the field,” explains Churchland.

Her team now reports that both humans and rats made more accurate decisions when presented with combined multisensory information and that this decision-making was close to being statistically optimal – a mathematical prediction of how well each subject could possibly perform in the task.

The researchers have also found evidence that offers fresh insight into how the brain deals with the challenge of having a visual processing system that’s slower that the auditory processing system. “Even though visual and auditory stimuli don’t come in exactly at the same time, we think that the brain keeps events in sequence by processing each sensory cue in parallel, fusing the two signals at a later stage and then making a judgment about the fused signal,” elaborates Churchland.

Her team next plans to investigate how the two streams of information are being combined and how the brain combines sensory experience with memory. “Now that we have a good animal model in which to investigate these questions, the world—or the brain—is our oyster,” she says.

This work was funded by grants from the National Institute of Health and the John Merck Fund.

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“Multisensory decision-making in rats and humans,” appears in the Journal of Neuroscience on March 14. The full citation is: David Raposo, John P. Sheppard, Paul R. Schrater, and Anne K. Churchland. The paper can be downloaded at http://www.jneurosci.org/ using the DOI:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4998-11.2012

About Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Founded in 1890, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) has shaped contemporary biomedical research and education with programs in cancer, neuroscience, plant biology and quantitative biology. CSHL is ranked number one in the world by Thomson Reuters for impact of its research in molecular biology and genetics. The Laboratory has been home to eight Nobel Prize winners. Today, CSHL's multidisciplinary scientific community is more than 360 scientists strong and its Meetings & Courses program hosts more than 12,500 scientists from around the world each year to its Long Island campus and its China center. Tens of thousands more benefit from the research, reviews, and ideas published in journals and books distributed internationally by CSHL Press. The Laboratory's education arm also includes a graduate school and programs for undergraduates as well as middle and high school students and teachers. CSHL is a private, not-for-profit institution on the north shore of Long Island. For more information, visit www.cshl.edu.

Written by: Hema Bashyam, Science Writer | bashyam@cshl.edu | 516-367-6822



 

 
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