New York State Supports Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Expansion and Stem-cell Research

Cold Spring Harbor, NY – New York Governor Eliot Spitzer, Empire State Development (ESD) Chairman Pat Foye, and Dr. Bruce Stillman, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) president today announced a $2 million grant to purchase new equipment for the Hillside Campus facilities project. The grant reaffirms New York State’s commitment to encouraging the growth of the local biotech industry and recognizes CSHL’s long history of research discoveries that improve the human condition.

“Bioscience is an important and growing sector of New York’s innovation economy,” said Governor Spitzer. “Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory’s decision to add jobs on Long Island speaks to its faith in the steps that the state is undertaking to improve the business climate and encourage the growth of strategic industries. This grant will help provide the wherewithal to purchase the equipment necessary to continue attracting the top talent the Laboratory needs to maintain its world-class status.”

“Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory discoveries have been the catalyst for a long list of real-world biotech applications over the last quarter century,” Dr. Stillman said. “I want to thank Governor Spitzer and Chairman Foye for their support of this institution. This two million dollar grant will enable our researchers to continue to make groundbreaking discoveries benefiting not only New Yorkers, but all of mankind.”

When completed in early 2009, CSHL’s $200 million Hillside Campus research complex will include six new research facilities and a 40% increase in laboratory space. The buildings will house the Laboratory’s cutting-edge research programs for cancer, neuroscience, and human genetics. In 2003, New York State awarded a $20 million grant to CSHL to assist with the construction of the Hillside Campus. Today’s ESD grant will help partially equip the complex with $13 million in state-of-the-art research equipment.

Empire State Development is New York’s chief economic development agency, encompassing business, workforce and community development. “Fostering the growth of biotechnology companies is one of Empire State Development’s highest downstate priorities,” said ESD Chairman Foye. “This grant is an important first step in forging strong relationships with companies commercializing Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory’s groundbreaking research.”

Earlier this week, the Empire State Stem Cell Board awarded a $380,933 grant to CSHL as part of New York State’s new multi-year stem cell research program. The funds will support CSHL’s stem cell research of cancer tumors by Patrick Paddison, Ph.D.; nervous system tumors by Linda Van Aelst, Ph.D.; mood disorders by Grigori Enikolopov, Ph.D., and attempts to regulate stem cell activity by Marja Timmermans, Ph.D.

“Funding for these programs is crucial for CSHL to remain at the cutting edge of stem cell research,” said Dr. Stillman. “With each new discovery at CSHL revolutionizing society, our role as an economic driver of the local, regional, and national economy warrants continued financial support from the government.”

It is estimated that for each scientific job at CSHL, five additional jobs are created to support that scientist’s work.

Established in 2007 by Governor Spitzer, the Empire State Stem Cell Board oversees and administers $600 million in funding to promote stem cell research and development at institutions throughout the state, building the infrastructure needed to support robust research communities. The grant awarded to CSHL is part of the first round of funding in 2008 for 25 institutions with stem cell research and training programs. These Institutional Development Grants are designed to increase the capacity of New York State research institutions to engage in stem cell research.

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory is a private, non-profit research and education institution dedicated to exploring molecular biology and genetics in order to advance the understanding and ability to diagnose and treat cancers, neurological diseases, and other causes of human suffering.  For more information, visit www.cshl.edu.